Paradise Lost: The Archaeological Landscape of a Late Nineteenth Century Queensland Gold Mining Community

01st June 2006

Jo Dudley

BA(Hons), School of Social Science, The University of Queensland, October 2005

In this thesis I investigate the presence of marginalised groups (based on gender, ethnicity, class and status) within a late nineteenth century Queensland gold mining town, compare their social and spatial manifestation with prevalent social customs and mores, and evaluate the appropriate use of combining multi- evidential and landscape methodologies to find and interpret marginalised groups in the archaeological record.

The use of a multi-evidential dataset that combines historical, archival, spatial mapping and archaeological evidence enables the collation of the widest possible information on all those present at Paradise. By using a landscape approach to interpret the social and spatial manifestation of marginalised groups present at Paradise I was able to recognise the human social nature of the landscape, to interpret the landscape as a means of social expression, and to answer research questions on social boundaries, spatial patterning, gender and ethnic negotiation. Paradise is revealed as a distinct landscape of multiple and diverse identities; with residents using agency to negotiate society’s rules, to actively create and maintain spatial and social relations, and to shape the world in which they live. I argue that the results outlined in this thesis confirm that a combination of multi-evidential and landscape methodologies in historical archaeological research is appropriate for interpreting multiple identities and spatialities.

Jo Dudley
Paradise Lost: The Archaeological Landscape of a Late Nineteenth Century Queensland Gold Mining Community
June 2006
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Thesis Abstracts
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