The temporality of cultural material on a deflated dune system at Abbot Point, central Queensland coast

01st June 2006

Barker Figure 1 AA62Bryce Barker

Introduction

Abbot Point on the central Queensland coast has long been recognised as an area of cultural heritage significance (Environmental Protection Agency 1999). The area has essentially been ignored in terms of research archaeology because of the lack of integrity of the cultural material, nearly all of which sits on deflated dune surfaces. Because of the problems associated with preservation of open sites in coastal tropical environments (see Bird 1992) most archaeological reconstructions in the region have been based on rockshelter deposits. However, the sheer volume and density of archaeological material found along the coast in this region indicate that open coastal sites such as Abbot Point and Upstart Bay to the north were probably intensively used with evidence of a much greater range of generalised hunter-gatherer activity in comparison to the more specialised rockshelter sites (Barker 2004; Bird 1992; Brayshaw 1990). Thus, given the evidence of intensive use of Abbot Point and its central location within a system of other clearly linked sites within the region (see below), it was felt that an attempt should be made to include this site within the wider framework of regional site patterning and use and that in this context an attempt should be made to establish its temporality.

Image caption: Abott Point on the central Queensland coast (published in Australian Archaeology 62:44).
Bryce Barker
The temporality of cultural material on a deflated dune system at Abbot Point, central Queensland coast
June 2006
62
44-46
Short Report
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