The strong arm of the law: Aboriginal rangers, anthropology and archaeology

05th January 2014

Map showing the study area (published in Australian Archaeology 47:20).

Map showing the Cape York Peninsula study area (published in Australian Archaeology 47:20).

Veronica Strang

Introduction*

In the course of conducting fieldwork with Aboriginal people, anthropologists and archaeologists are finding, with increasing frequency, that some of their most important interactions are with the Rangers appointed by the communities to protect their interests. Whenever they can get the funding to do so, Aboriginal groups in Queensland are employing young or middle-aged men as ‘Community Rangers’ to represent them in negotiations with other groups, and to police outsiders’ access to and use of their traditional country. As communities continue to struggle to regain a measure of control over their land, particularly in regions such as the Cape York Peninsula where tourism and other developments are burgeoning, this formal and public role has rapidly become a very critical one.

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Strang, V.
The strong arm of the law: Aboriginal rangers, anthropology and archaeology
December 1998
47
20–29
Article
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