The Menindee Lakes: A regional archaeology

19th November 2013

The Menindee Lakes on the central Darling River (published in Australian Archaeology 57:43).

The Menindee Lakes on the central Darling River (published in Australian Archaeology 57:43).

Colin Pardoe

The Menindee Lakes are a ‘chain of ponds’ or series of large overflow lakes nestled in the Darling River floodplain, which is situated disconformably in the arid zone. They form an outpost of the greater Southeast, where it meets the Centralian desert. An intensive archaeological survey of the Lakes recorded 4,978 new sites and features at 2,432 localities. Distribution and patterning of sites was correlated with environmental data using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Survey results revealed distinctive characteristics for this region: fields of ovens and large ashy grey deposits; two very different kinds of milling equipment; and stone tools representative of both desert and southeastern technologies. The Baakantji live on a shifting frontier, part of two larger regional systems with very different ecologies and social and biological systems. The Baakantji territory of the Menindee Lakes emerges as a distinct region, sharing features with both Desert and Riverine economies.

Pardoe, C.
The Menindee Lakes: A regional archaeology
2003
57
42–53
Article
You must be a member to download the attachment ( Login / Sign up )