The antiquity of grinding stones in semi-arid western New South Wales

23rd May 2014

The Willandra Lakes study area (published in Australian Archaeology 32:3).

The Willandra Lakes study area (published in Australian Archaeology 32:3).

Jane Balme

Introduction*

Western New South Wales is well known as one of the largest regional data sets of Pleistocene archaeological material in Australia. Dating of aeolian sediments has been possible through the archaeological accumulation and subsequent preservation of organic remains within dune sequences associated with lakes and waterways. The identifiable stratification within these, produced by fluctuations in lake and river levels, has provided good potential to interpret the age of archaeological material within them. However, western NSW archaeological sites are generally exposed, and partially eroded, open sites. Once exposed, and during the process of erosion, non-contemporaneous materials become mixed. Eroded sites can be expected to exhibit both laterally and vertically mixed materials.

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Balme, J.
The antiquity of grinding stones in semi-arid western New South Wales
June 1991
32
3–9
Article
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