Pleistocene stone pendant from Western Australia

12th January 2014

The pendant (published in Australian Archaeology 45:32).

The pendant (published in Australian Archaeology 45:32).

Robert Bednarik

Introduction*

One of the most unusual objects so far recovered in Australia’s Pleistocene archaeology is a perforated stone fragment excavated from the cave deposit of Devil’s Lair in 1973 (Dortch and Merrilees 1973). The marl object, thought to be between 12,000 and 19,000 years old, has been described as a possible pendant (Dortch 1979a, 1980). It is one of several unusual objects reported from this site that have been subjected to prolonged discussion and speculation. There are also several ‘plaques’ with engraved markings thought to be anthropic and some other perforated objects, including three ground bone beads (Dortch 1976, 1979b, 1984; Flood 1995:109–10). In response to critical review, identifications of several finds from the site were recently revised (Dortch and Dortch 1996: Table 1), and C.E. Dortch, the excavator, has arranged for the marked and some of the perforated objects to be subjected to specialist study (Dortch and Dortch 1996:30).

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Bednarik, R.
Pleistocene stone pendant from Western Australia
December 1997
45
32–34
Article
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