Moulding and casting Aboriginal carved trees

23rd January 2014

A zoomorphic or anthropomorphic figure carved into the bark of a northern silky oak near Ravenshoe, NE Qld (published in Australian Archaeology 41:17).

A zoomorphic or anthropomorphic figure carved into the bark of a northern silky oak near Ravenshoe, NE Qld (published in Australian Archaeology 41:17).

Gordon Grimwade, Karen Mickan and Alison Darroch

Introduction*

The documentation, conservation and interpretation of isolated cultural heritage sites present diverse challenges. In the wet tropics of northeast Australia (Fig. 1) these challenges are exacerbated by adverse climatic conditions. Organic materials suffer severely in such conditions. Aboriginal carved trees of the wet tropics are little known resources of the Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage Area extending north from Townsville to just south of Cooktown. Their documentation and research has been minimal.

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Grimwade, G., K. Mickan and A. Darroch
Moulding and casting Aboriginal carved trees
December 1995
41
15–21
Article
You must be a member to download the attachment ( Login / Sign up )