Mapping the shape of contemporary Australian archaeology: Implications for archaeology teaching and learning

20th November 2013

Respondents by age and gender (published in Australian Archaeology 61:13).

Respondents by age and gender (published in Australian Archaeology 61:13).

Sean Ulm, Steve Nichols and Cameo Dalley

Results from the largest survey of professional Australian archaeologists ever undertaken are considered in the context of teaching and learning issues. The survey asked questions about the composition of the archaeological workforce, professional activities of archaeologists, skills and qualifications needed to work in archaeology, and opinions on university learning and professional training. Data about the discipline are a basic requirement for informed decision-making on archaeology teaching and learning, but few useful datasets are available. While results generally confirm anecdotal evidence and findings of previous surveys, the large sample size (n=301) enables more detailed characterisation of important aspects of the contemporary archaeological workplace. An analysis of self-assessed skill sets and skill gaps indicates that the training of many professionals left significant gaps in several core skill and knowledge areas which are remarkably consistent across various industry sectors. These findings can be used to inform curriculum development and the exploration of new archaeology teaching and learning models that are more attuned to the contemporary Australian archaeological workplace.

Ulm, S., S. Nichols and C. Dalley
Mapping the shape of contemporary Australian archaeology: Implications for archaeology teaching and learning
2005
61
11–23
Article
You must be a member to download the attachment ( Login / Sign up )