Late Pleistocene environments and Aboriginal settlement patterns in Tasmania

22nd May 2014

Map showing locations mentioned in the text (published in Australian Archaeology 36:3).

Map showing locations mentioned in the text (published in Australian Archaeology 36:3).

Ian Thomas

Introduction*

A recent trend in Tasmanian Aboriginal studies has been the development of ecologically based archaeological models. Many of these have addressed the role played by forest distributions in regard to Aboriginal settlement patterns. The majority’s opinion is that forests of all kinds acted as barriers to settlement and communication. However, a close reading of the available ethnohistoric  literature and an analysis of inland site distributions reveals that most Aboriginal campsites and paths were located in forested areas (Thomas 1991). Thus, a situation has developed in which forests have been regarded on the one hand as barriers and on the other as corridors.

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Thomas, I.
Late Pleistocene environments and Aboriginal settlement patterns in Tasmania
June 1993
36
1–11
Article
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