Biogeography, human ecology and prehistory in the sandridge deserts

22nd May 2014

Mike A. Smith

Introduction*

Stuart’s 1844–45 expedition was the first to enter the immense dunefields that ring the centre of the Australian landmass (Fig. l). Later exploring expeditions (e.g. Carnegie 1898; Giles 1889; Lindsay 1886; Warburton 1875) were to answer Mr Browne’s question. Such regions did indeed support small, and apparently flourishing, human populations. Had he known this, John Harris Browne, surgeon and savant on the 1844–45 expedition, might well have wondered how and when people had come to live in such inhospitable places. These are questions now central to current archaeological interest in the sandridge deserts.

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Smith, M.A.
Biogeography, human ecology and prehistory in the sandridge deserts
December 1993
37
35–50
Article
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