Beyond the looking-glass: Some thoughts on sociopolitics and reflexivity in Australian archaeology

23rd January 2014

Heather Burke, Christine Lovell-Jones and Claire Smith

Introduction*

A traditional strength of Australian archaeology has been the analysis of sociopolitical issues, especially the relationships between archaeologists and Aboriginal people (e.g. Allen 1983; Beck and McConnell 1986; Birkhead et al. 1992; Bowdler 1988; Davidson 1992; Frankel 1980; Golson 1986; Lewis and Rose 1985; McBryde 1986; Mowaljarlai et al. 1988; Mulvaney 1966; Murray 1989; Pardoe 1990; Sullivan 1983) and between archaeologists and the wider community (e.g. Bickford 1981; Clegg 1980; Gale and Jacobs 1987; Jones 1987; McBryde 1980; Megaw 1980; Mulvaney 1981; Smith et al. 1992). However, the nature of sociopolitical inquiry in Australian archaeology appears to be changing in response to an increased emphasis on reflexive techniques, including the use of text as data (e.g. Moser 1992a, l992b).

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Burke, H., C. Lovell-Jones and C. Smith
Beyond the looking-glass: Some thoughts on sociopolitics and reflexivity in Australian archaeology
June 1994
38
13–22
Article
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