An Aboriginal burial with grave goods near Cooma, New South Wales

22nd January 2014

Kangaroo teeth arranged to form a necklace, from the Cooma burial site (published in Australaian Archaeology 43:41).

Kangaroo teeth arranged to form a necklace, from the Cooma burial site (published in Australaian Archaeology 43:41).

Sue Feary

Introduction*

An Aboriginal site, accidentally exposed during a creek flooding episode in 1991, contained the skeletons of two individuals dated to ca 7000 years BP, together with a suite of rare grave goods. Although highly disturbed, the site is highly significant, both as the oldest recorded burial on the New South Wales southern tablelands and for the rarity of the grave goods. The pierced kangaroo teeth found with the burials and presumably once part of a necklace are the first of their kind to be found in Australia. Similar items recorded previously include a necklace of pierced Sarcophilous teeth discovered at Lake Nitchie in western New South Wales (Macintosh et al. 1970) and a headband of grooved macropod teeth at Roonka Flat on the Murray River (Pretty 1977).

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

Feary, S.
An Aboriginal burial with grave goods near Cooma, New South Wales
December 1996
43
40–4
Short Report
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