Aboriginal fish hooks in southern Australia: Evidence, arguments and implications

13th November 2013

Rupert Gerritsen

Introduction*

Gippsland bone hook (published in Australian Archaeology 52:20).

Gippsland bone hook (published in Australian Archaeology 52:20).

From time to time, in the wanderings of my imagination, I mull over the question of what should be my first course of action if I were the proverbial Martian archaeologist (Jones and Bowler 1980:26), just arrived on Earth to investigate its peoples, cultures and history. And in this imaginary quest, I ask myself, would my time be more productively spent observing and interrogating the ‘natives’, or simply heading for the nearest rubbish dump to begin immediate excavations, a la Rathje (1974)? But, having chosen the latter, what then would I make of such things, in my putative excavations, as discarded ‘lava lamps’, ‘fluffy dice’ or garden gnomes? Phallic symbols perhaps, ear-muffs for protection from ‘rap’ music, maybe cult figurines!

*Note that an abstract was not included with this paper, and so the introductory paragraph has been included here instead of the abstract.

 

Gerritsen, R.
Aboriginal fish hooks in southern Australia: Evidence, arguments and implications
2001
52
18–28
Article
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